Tuesday, June 14, 2016

On the importance of philosophy in the understanding of magic



When you're constantly researching magic, grimoires, and the like - as I am, you soon need to know the proper context with which to engage with a particular spirit or ritual. You need to know what was culturally the norm from where the ritual came from geographically, culturally, and historically. Forget to apply context and you fail to engage with the magic or the spirit properly, either offending the spirit in question or failing to produce any real tangible result. Studying the principles of philosophy is part of learning this context. You also do not throw everything into a pot and stir and expect it to taste good. You make lousy meals that way, and the same with magic - you end up with a lousy understanding and practical application of magic.

Particularly poignant and stirring for me, in light of recent injustices and tragedies, is a philosophy book recommended by Michael Strojan. It is, "The Consolation of Philosophy," by Ancius Boethius. Boethius had been falsely imprisoned by accusation of known and banished criminals he was laid in chains. The book consists of Boethius' laments and the appearance of the Divine Lady, Philosophy to help recover his reason from his collapse into madness and despair. We could all use a bit of that these days yeah? I'm still working through the book but it's a true gem, with some poetry to it's soul.

Anyways looking to Philosophy, we really need to begin with Pythagoras - or the even earlier influences upon Pythagoras. This is not very easily done, but fortunately, Jake Stratton Kent has done an admirable job with his Encyclopedia Goetia series from Scarlet Imprint. Since we are concerned with Philosophy as regards to magic, I highly recommend these books:

The True Grimoire, Geosophia the Argo of Magic, and The Testament of Cyprian the Mage.

Check them out, they are worth the purchase, and your patronage at Scarlet Imprint.

Now on more particularly to Pythagoras, google in this instance a friend, has dug up a helpful article at Stanford, check it out:

Huffman, Carl, "Pythagoras", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Summer 2014 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL = http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/pythagoras/

Here I leave you dear readers, as I am also reading and buffing up on my knowledge and application of philosophy. May these initial resources serve you well in your own researches, and I will have more entries as my scholarship proceeds in this current vein. Plato, Aristotle and many others I'll be providing my research sources as I work through them. Cheers!

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